108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street

Share 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street on Facebook Share 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street on Twitter Share 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street on Linkedin Email 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street link

Consultation has concluded


Project Update, June 2022: A Public Hearing was held on June 27, 2022, after which Council supported the bylaw adoptions (gave Third Reading) for the Heritage Revitalization Agreement and Special Development Permit.

Click here to view the Public Hearing and Council meeting recordings from June 27, 2022, and click here to read the Council package and all public correspondence received.


What's being proposed?

Heritage Revitalization Agreement (HRA) and Special Development Permit (SDP) applications have been received which would allow for the development of a six (north side) to eight storey (south side) multiple unit residential building at 108 – 118 Royal Avenue and 74 – 82 First Street with 189 residential units with a total floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.29. The HRA would facilitate retention, on-site relocation, restoration, and protection of the Woods House (1890) at 82 First Street (within which 2 residential units are proposed), as well as the retention and off-site relocation of the Henderson House (1930) at 112 Royal Avenue.

The proposal provides:

  • a total of 25 three-bedroom units (13.2%) and 60 two-bedroom units (31.7%) which exceeds the family friendly housing requirements of 10% three-bedroom and 30% two - and three-bedroom units.
  • a total of 253 underground vehicle parking spaces as well as 236 long term and 12 short term bicycle parking spaces which meets bylaw requirements.

The proposed development would provide a dedication along the western property line to support the construction of a multi-use pathway from Cunningham Street to Royal Avenue, adjacent to Qayqayt Elementary School, and would also provide an enhanced sidewalk (2.5 metre) along Royal Avenue and a mid-block connection between First and Windsor Streets. The applicant has proposed to purchase a portion of Windsor Street which functions as a City lane. This land sale would allow the applicant to shift the building to the east, allowing space for the multi-use pathway adjacent to the school.

Click here to view drawings of the proposed development.


How can I engage?

There have been multiple opportunities for the public to provide feedback through the application review process. The process included applicant-led consultation and review by City committees. The review process has been iterative and revisions were considered, based on consultation feedback, throughout the process.

A Public Hearing was held on June 27, 2022, after which Council voted to support the application. All opportunities for engagement with this application are now complete


Project Update, June 2022: A Public Hearing was held on June 27, 2022, after which Council supported the bylaw adoptions (gave Third Reading) for the Heritage Revitalization Agreement and Special Development Permit.

Click here to view the Public Hearing and Council meeting recordings from June 27, 2022, and click here to read the Council package and all public correspondence received.


What's being proposed?

Heritage Revitalization Agreement (HRA) and Special Development Permit (SDP) applications have been received which would allow for the development of a six (north side) to eight storey (south side) multiple unit residential building at 108 – 118 Royal Avenue and 74 – 82 First Street with 189 residential units with a total floor space ratio (FSR) of 3.29. The HRA would facilitate retention, on-site relocation, restoration, and protection of the Woods House (1890) at 82 First Street (within which 2 residential units are proposed), as well as the retention and off-site relocation of the Henderson House (1930) at 112 Royal Avenue.

The proposal provides:

  • a total of 25 three-bedroom units (13.2%) and 60 two-bedroom units (31.7%) which exceeds the family friendly housing requirements of 10% three-bedroom and 30% two - and three-bedroom units.
  • a total of 253 underground vehicle parking spaces as well as 236 long term and 12 short term bicycle parking spaces which meets bylaw requirements.

The proposed development would provide a dedication along the western property line to support the construction of a multi-use pathway from Cunningham Street to Royal Avenue, adjacent to Qayqayt Elementary School, and would also provide an enhanced sidewalk (2.5 metre) along Royal Avenue and a mid-block connection between First and Windsor Streets. The applicant has proposed to purchase a portion of Windsor Street which functions as a City lane. This land sale would allow the applicant to shift the building to the east, allowing space for the multi-use pathway adjacent to the school.

Click here to view drawings of the proposed development.


How can I engage?

There have been multiple opportunities for the public to provide feedback through the application review process. The process included applicant-led consultation and review by City committees. The review process has been iterative and revisions were considered, based on consultation feedback, throughout the process.

A Public Hearing was held on June 27, 2022, after which Council voted to support the application. All opportunities for engagement with this application are now complete

Consultation has concluded

Have a question about 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street? Add it here and we will aim to reply within five business days. For more complex questions or multiple queries, the response process may require additional time as we prepare a comprehensive answer. In these cases, we will aim to get back to you within 10 business days and kindly request your patience as we do so. If we think your question would be of interest to others, we'll post your question and our response here. Thanks! 

  • Share This corner of heritage houses has over 70 mature trees - hawthorns, cedars, rhodos, hemlocks. They're home to nesting hummingbirds, chickadees, nuthatches and in the summer - bats. The drawings make it look as though ALL of the older mature trees will be demolished. These trees create an essential green corridor between Agnes Crescent Park and Queens Park. It will take decades to replace the size of that tree canopy with new plantings (of which there are few evident in the drawings). This would be contrary to the city's Urban Forest strategy. How many trees would be torn out and how many mature trees currently on site would be retained in this project. on Facebook Share This corner of heritage houses has over 70 mature trees - hawthorns, cedars, rhodos, hemlocks. They're home to nesting hummingbirds, chickadees, nuthatches and in the summer - bats. The drawings make it look as though ALL of the older mature trees will be demolished. These trees create an essential green corridor between Agnes Crescent Park and Queens Park. It will take decades to replace the size of that tree canopy with new plantings (of which there are few evident in the drawings). This would be contrary to the city's Urban Forest strategy. How many trees would be torn out and how many mature trees currently on site would be retained in this project. on Twitter Share This corner of heritage houses has over 70 mature trees - hawthorns, cedars, rhodos, hemlocks. They're home to nesting hummingbirds, chickadees, nuthatches and in the summer - bats. The drawings make it look as though ALL of the older mature trees will be demolished. These trees create an essential green corridor between Agnes Crescent Park and Queens Park. It will take decades to replace the size of that tree canopy with new plantings (of which there are few evident in the drawings). This would be contrary to the city's Urban Forest strategy. How many trees would be torn out and how many mature trees currently on site would be retained in this project. on Linkedin Email This corner of heritage houses has over 70 mature trees - hawthorns, cedars, rhodos, hemlocks. They're home to nesting hummingbirds, chickadees, nuthatches and in the summer - bats. The drawings make it look as though ALL of the older mature trees will be demolished. These trees create an essential green corridor between Agnes Crescent Park and Queens Park. It will take decades to replace the size of that tree canopy with new plantings (of which there are few evident in the drawings). This would be contrary to the city's Urban Forest strategy. How many trees would be torn out and how many mature trees currently on site would be retained in this project. link

    This corner of heritage houses has over 70 mature trees - hawthorns, cedars, rhodos, hemlocks. They're home to nesting hummingbirds, chickadees, nuthatches and in the summer - bats. The drawings make it look as though ALL of the older mature trees will be demolished. These trees create an essential green corridor between Agnes Crescent Park and Queens Park. It will take decades to replace the size of that tree canopy with new plantings (of which there are few evident in the drawings). This would be contrary to the city's Urban Forest strategy. How many trees would be torn out and how many mature trees currently on site would be retained in this project.

    AlinNewWest asked almost 2 years ago

    Thank you for your question. The proposal seeks to balance multiple needs and priorities including the creation of new housing, heritage preservation and creation of an urban forest canopy. The development applications and corresponding Tree Permit application includes the removal of all 71 on-site trees as they are located within the building footprint and underground parkade. While three high value trees would be lost, a majority of the trees have irreversible structural health defects and are not good candidates for retention. A total of 120 replacement trees would be required with 57 trees proposed to be replaced on-site.

    The City arborist has been working with the applicants’ landscape architecture team to develop a replacement tree plan that best achieves the City’s goals to improve canopy cover. This work involves achieving increased soil volumes to support medium/large sized trees rather than multiple smaller sized trees. For replacement requirements that cannot be accommodated on-site, a cash-in-lieu contribution would be made to allow the City’s Parks Department to plant trees on civic lands. Replacement trees would be prioritized in the vicinity of the development.

  • Share The homes are faced towards the streets. I'm afraid that if parents buy the homes, their kids won't know to not cross the street. Is there anything you could do to improve? on Facebook Share The homes are faced towards the streets. I'm afraid that if parents buy the homes, their kids won't know to not cross the street. Is there anything you could do to improve? on Twitter Share The homes are faced towards the streets. I'm afraid that if parents buy the homes, their kids won't know to not cross the street. Is there anything you could do to improve? on Linkedin Email The homes are faced towards the streets. I'm afraid that if parents buy the homes, their kids won't know to not cross the street. Is there anything you could do to improve? link

    The homes are faced towards the streets. I'm afraid that if parents buy the homes, their kids won't know to not cross the street. Is there anything you could do to improve?

    winniechau asked over 2 years ago

    As per the City’s Downtown Development Permit Area Design Guidelines, residential buildings are designed to provide connection to the street to animate the street frontage. The Downtown Building and Public Realm Design Guidelines also encourage passive surveillance of the street through active uses like unit entries. 

    Along Royal Avenue, the development is designed with a 3.9 metre setback from the property line that includes stepped planters to enclose the patio areas as well as a gated entry to each unit. This provides an area outside the door and gate before leaving the property to the sidewalk. In addition, a 2.5 metre multi-use path (sidewalk) and 1.3 metre landscape boulevard area is provided between the property line and the roadway on Royal Avenue.  The widened sidewalk will provide a more comfortable connection for the people walking along Royal Avenue. 

  • Share Will this property have underground parking? If so, how many spots? It’s all ready a fight to get a spot at 1st and Agnes. What about parking during construction? Would this take place the same time as the new bridge? Also, if this is a HRA, why doesn’t the building fit into a heritage design? It’s brand new, boring architecture that has nothing to do with any heritage. on Facebook Share Will this property have underground parking? If so, how many spots? It’s all ready a fight to get a spot at 1st and Agnes. What about parking during construction? Would this take place the same time as the new bridge? Also, if this is a HRA, why doesn’t the building fit into a heritage design? It’s brand new, boring architecture that has nothing to do with any heritage. on Twitter Share Will this property have underground parking? If so, how many spots? It’s all ready a fight to get a spot at 1st and Agnes. What about parking during construction? Would this take place the same time as the new bridge? Also, if this is a HRA, why doesn’t the building fit into a heritage design? It’s brand new, boring architecture that has nothing to do with any heritage. on Linkedin Email Will this property have underground parking? If so, how many spots? It’s all ready a fight to get a spot at 1st and Agnes. What about parking during construction? Would this take place the same time as the new bridge? Also, if this is a HRA, why doesn’t the building fit into a heritage design? It’s brand new, boring architecture that has nothing to do with any heritage. link

    Will this property have underground parking? If so, how many spots? It’s all ready a fight to get a spot at 1st and Agnes. What about parking during construction? Would this take place the same time as the new bridge? Also, if this is a HRA, why doesn’t the building fit into a heritage design? It’s brand new, boring architecture that has nothing to do with any heritage.

    AgnesGirl asked almost 3 years ago

    The proposal at 108-118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street would include two levels of underground parking providing 252 spaces for the development. This would exceed the parking requirements of the City’s Zoning Bylaw. Parking during construction would be coordinated by the City’s Transportation Management Plan which is used to guide and manage traffic impacts including potential road closures, detours, flagging personnel etc. The City’s transportation division also issues Street Occupancy Permits for any activity that requires the closure of a segment of road, travel lanes, or loading areas. Staff also work closely with project owners, and when applicable, encourage project owners to work together to minimize neighbourhood disruptions. The timing of the construction of this project would be dependent on a decision of Council on the Heritage Revitalization Agreement and issuance of the Special Development Permit. 

    With regards to heritage, the design seeks to complement the heritage house through the use of brick along the lower levels of the building. The heritage house was also sited to create prominence and a cluster of heritage houses on the southeast corner near First Street and Agnes Street. New buildings on sites with heritage assets are designed to be in accordance with the Standards and Guidelines for the Conservation of Historic Places in Canada which looks for those new buildings to be visually distinguishable from, though respectful to the historic asset. 

  • Share Will these be rental units? What percentage will be reserved for affordable housing? What would the cost be for an “affordable” unit (2 and 3 bedroom)? on Facebook Share Will these be rental units? What percentage will be reserved for affordable housing? What would the cost be for an “affordable” unit (2 and 3 bedroom)? on Twitter Share Will these be rental units? What percentage will be reserved for affordable housing? What would the cost be for an “affordable” unit (2 and 3 bedroom)? on Linkedin Email Will these be rental units? What percentage will be reserved for affordable housing? What would the cost be for an “affordable” unit (2 and 3 bedroom)? link

    Will these be rental units? What percentage will be reserved for affordable housing? What would the cost be for an “affordable” unit (2 and 3 bedroom)?

    Teatime asked about 3 years ago

    The application at 108 -118 Royal Avenue and 74-82 First Street has proposed to include 168 stratified condo units. The proposal does not include either market rental or subsidized (affordable) rental housing. 

    The City’s Inclusionary Housing Policy secures new affordable rental housing for very low and low income renters through the provision of below-market and non-market housing units in a variety of circumstances. The policy also outlines some application types and circumstances in which development applications would be exempt from the requirements of the policy. These exemptions currently include wood frame buildings and, as this proposed development is wood frame construction, the City would not require that inclusionary housing units be provided in this case. The City also offers a variety of incentives in the Secured Market Rental Housing Policy to encourage provision of market rental housing units within new developments which applicants may choose to use.


  • Share Will roadwork be done to fix the neighbourhood surrounding the development? Agnes Street between Elliot Street to First Street, as well as First Street itself is very damaged due to the high traffic going into the neigbourhood, such as buses and traffic from the elementary school daily. This development will also likely lead to road closures and issues getting out of the general area surrounding the area. How will that be mitigated? on Facebook Share Will roadwork be done to fix the neighbourhood surrounding the development? Agnes Street between Elliot Street to First Street, as well as First Street itself is very damaged due to the high traffic going into the neigbourhood, such as buses and traffic from the elementary school daily. This development will also likely lead to road closures and issues getting out of the general area surrounding the area. How will that be mitigated? on Twitter Share Will roadwork be done to fix the neighbourhood surrounding the development? Agnes Street between Elliot Street to First Street, as well as First Street itself is very damaged due to the high traffic going into the neigbourhood, such as buses and traffic from the elementary school daily. This development will also likely lead to road closures and issues getting out of the general area surrounding the area. How will that be mitigated? on Linkedin Email Will roadwork be done to fix the neighbourhood surrounding the development? Agnes Street between Elliot Street to First Street, as well as First Street itself is very damaged due to the high traffic going into the neigbourhood, such as buses and traffic from the elementary school daily. This development will also likely lead to road closures and issues getting out of the general area surrounding the area. How will that be mitigated? link

    Will roadwork be done to fix the neighbourhood surrounding the development? Agnes Street between Elliot Street to First Street, as well as First Street itself is very damaged due to the high traffic going into the neigbourhood, such as buses and traffic from the elementary school daily. This development will also likely lead to road closures and issues getting out of the general area surrounding the area. How will that be mitigated?

    EC asked about 3 years ago

    The development is required to upgrade portions of the street frontages that surround the property including First Street, Royal Avenue, and Cunningham Street. 

    All construction activity in the City of New Westminster would follow the standards and guidelines outlined in the Good Neighbour Protocol as well as comply with applicable bylaws such as the construction noise bylaw. The City’s Transportation Management Plan is used to guide and manage traffic impacts including potential road closures, detours, flagging personnel, etc. The City’s Transportation Division also issues Street Occupancy Permits for any activity that requires the closure of a segment of road, travel lanes, or loading areas. Staff also work closely with project owners, and when applicable, encourage project owners to work together to minimize neighbourhood disruptions.  

    A Transportation Management Plan is required for all stages of construction of land development projects. This plan requires identification of all road closures or disruptions to vehicle movements, walking, cycling and transit. The Plan must account for needs of surround activities such as drop-off and pick-up activities around the school, and minimize impacts to these priority needs and functions.

    Redevelopment and improvement along Agnes Street falls under the Agnes Greenway project. For more information of the project and timelines please visit: www.beheardnewwest.ca/agnes-greenway