Uptown Active Transportation Improvements

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Project Update, July 2022: Construction of the New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector is set to get underway in the coming weeks! We expect construction to start later this summer. Stay tuned for more detailed information as it’s available.

Meanwhile, construction of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades along Seventh Avenue between Eighth Street and Fifth Street has now been postponed until next year (2023). This is to coordinate with the planned water main work by Metro Vancouver along Seventh Avenue next year. Our goal is to minimize the overall impacts from both construction projects. Again, more details will be shared as they are available.



Project Update: April 21, 2022 - Round 2 Engagement Reports

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report for the second round of engagement is now available. From February 3-22, 2022, we heard from more than 300 participants across a variety of engagement activities: a survey, a pop-up, stakeholder meetings, and school-based engagement. Check out the report to learn about participants' level of support for the recommended designs for upgrades to the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue, and the new active transportation connector to New Westminster Secondary School. We also heard about how well the designs achieve goals such as safety, what participants like about the recommended designs, suggestions for improvement, and more.

A shorter, visual summary is also available here. All participants’ verbatim comments are also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).


Project Update: February 3, 2022 - Round 2 Engagement on Recommended Designs

During the first round of public and stakeholder engagement last fall, we heard your priorities and preferences for upgrades to the Rotary Crosstown Greenway, and a new cycling connection to New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS). The project team has developed the recommended designs using what was heard from public and stakeholder engagement in the fall of 2021, along with a comprehensive technical analysis.

Map highlighting the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway, further emphasizing the section of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway between Eighth Street and Fifth Street where upgrades will be implemented. It also shows the RCG connecting to the chosen route for the NWSS Cycling Connector from Seventh Avenue up Sixth Street directly to the school.

Input from round two of engagement will be used to help the project team further refine the designs as the team works toward construction in the summer and fall of 2022. Ultimately, your feedback will help contribute to reimagining some streets to make it easier for people of all ages and abilities to cycle, wheel, or walk comfortably and safely in Uptown.

To learn more about some of the key design features CLICK HERE for a visual summary of the recommended design for the NWSS Cycling Corridor and CLICK HERE for a visual summary of the recommended design for the RCG Upgrades.

The video below is a presentation by the project team on the recommended designs for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.



Project Update: November 15, 2021 - Round 1 Engagement Reports

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report is now available. Check out the report for what participants chose as their preferred design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Improvements and preferred routing options for the NWSS Cycling Connector, as well as key priorities for each corridor, as heard from the public and stakeholder groups. A shorter, visual summary is also available here.

The full survey report as well as all participants’ verbatim comments are also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).



The City of New Westminster is launching the design process for the Uptown Active Transportation Improvements. This includes two exciting projects that together will reimagine some of our streets to enable people of all ages and abilities to move comfortably and safely on foot, bicycle, and other non-motorized wheels in Uptown.

  1. The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) Upgrades will improve safety, comfort, and accessibility on the section of the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway along Seventh Avenue, between Eighth Street and Fifth Street. These upgrades will replace the interim bike lanes installed on Seventh Avenue in 2017.
  2. The new New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector project will link the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue to the east entrance of the new school on Sixth Street, enabling students, staff and visitors to conveniently and safely cycle, wheel or walk to the school from the east and south.

Both projects take direction from the vision set in the City of New Westminster’s Council-approved Uptown Streetscape Vision, to create “a vibrant commercial district with a distinct identity, accessible and sustainable transportation, and inviting and engaging public spaces that are welcoming to all people." Related to this project, engagement on the Uptown Sixth Street Public Realm Improvements will launch later this fall.

These projects align with the City’s Master Transportation Plan goals and 7 Bold Steps for Climate Action - specifically, Car-light Community and Quality People-Centred Public Realm.

Another key goal of this project is to provide a crosstown greenway and connection to NWSS that is safer and more comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, improves the cycling and walking experiences, as well as improves accessibility.

Additional goals include enhancing the public realm and tree canopy, seeking opportunities for green infrastructure, and reducing the impacts of motor vehicles and through traffic in this neighbourhood, while limiting the impacts to people who rely on on-street parking.

To learn more about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector, watch the project video below:



Project Update, July 2022: Construction of the New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector is set to get underway in the coming weeks! We expect construction to start later this summer. Stay tuned for more detailed information as it’s available.

Meanwhile, construction of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades along Seventh Avenue between Eighth Street and Fifth Street has now been postponed until next year (2023). This is to coordinate with the planned water main work by Metro Vancouver along Seventh Avenue next year. Our goal is to minimize the overall impacts from both construction projects. Again, more details will be shared as they are available.



Project Update: April 21, 2022 - Round 2 Engagement Reports

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report for the second round of engagement is now available. From February 3-22, 2022, we heard from more than 300 participants across a variety of engagement activities: a survey, a pop-up, stakeholder meetings, and school-based engagement. Check out the report to learn about participants' level of support for the recommended designs for upgrades to the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue, and the new active transportation connector to New Westminster Secondary School. We also heard about how well the designs achieve goals such as safety, what participants like about the recommended designs, suggestions for improvement, and more.

A shorter, visual summary is also available here. All participants’ verbatim comments are also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).


Project Update: February 3, 2022 - Round 2 Engagement on Recommended Designs

During the first round of public and stakeholder engagement last fall, we heard your priorities and preferences for upgrades to the Rotary Crosstown Greenway, and a new cycling connection to New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS). The project team has developed the recommended designs using what was heard from public and stakeholder engagement in the fall of 2021, along with a comprehensive technical analysis.

Map highlighting the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway, further emphasizing the section of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway between Eighth Street and Fifth Street where upgrades will be implemented. It also shows the RCG connecting to the chosen route for the NWSS Cycling Connector from Seventh Avenue up Sixth Street directly to the school.

Input from round two of engagement will be used to help the project team further refine the designs as the team works toward construction in the summer and fall of 2022. Ultimately, your feedback will help contribute to reimagining some streets to make it easier for people of all ages and abilities to cycle, wheel, or walk comfortably and safely in Uptown.

To learn more about some of the key design features CLICK HERE for a visual summary of the recommended design for the NWSS Cycling Corridor and CLICK HERE for a visual summary of the recommended design for the RCG Upgrades.

The video below is a presentation by the project team on the recommended designs for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.



Project Update: November 15, 2021 - Round 1 Engagement Reports

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report is now available. Check out the report for what participants chose as their preferred design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Improvements and preferred routing options for the NWSS Cycling Connector, as well as key priorities for each corridor, as heard from the public and stakeholder groups. A shorter, visual summary is also available here.

The full survey report as well as all participants’ verbatim comments are also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).



The City of New Westminster is launching the design process for the Uptown Active Transportation Improvements. This includes two exciting projects that together will reimagine some of our streets to enable people of all ages and abilities to move comfortably and safely on foot, bicycle, and other non-motorized wheels in Uptown.

  1. The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) Upgrades will improve safety, comfort, and accessibility on the section of the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway along Seventh Avenue, between Eighth Street and Fifth Street. These upgrades will replace the interim bike lanes installed on Seventh Avenue in 2017.
  2. The new New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector project will link the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue to the east entrance of the new school on Sixth Street, enabling students, staff and visitors to conveniently and safely cycle, wheel or walk to the school from the east and south.

Both projects take direction from the vision set in the City of New Westminster’s Council-approved Uptown Streetscape Vision, to create “a vibrant commercial district with a distinct identity, accessible and sustainable transportation, and inviting and engaging public spaces that are welcoming to all people." Related to this project, engagement on the Uptown Sixth Street Public Realm Improvements will launch later this fall.

These projects align with the City’s Master Transportation Plan goals and 7 Bold Steps for Climate Action - specifically, Car-light Community and Quality People-Centred Public Realm.

Another key goal of this project is to provide a crosstown greenway and connection to NWSS that is safer and more comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, improves the cycling and walking experiences, as well as improves accessibility.

Additional goals include enhancing the public realm and tree canopy, seeking opportunities for green infrastructure, and reducing the impacts of motor vehicles and through traffic in this neighbourhood, while limiting the impacts to people who rely on on-street parking.

To learn more about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector, watch the project video below:



Question and Answer

Have a question about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades or the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector? Please add it here and press submit. We will aim to reply within 5 business days. Sometimes answers require information from multiple sources. If the answer is going to take longer, we will let you know. If we think your question may be of interest to others, we'll post your question and our response here. Thank you for taking the time to write to us!

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    I don't see any plans for improvements on the Moody Park side of the RCG Intersection. The push button leaving the park is not accessible to all. It's hard to reach on city bikes, very difficult on longer family bikes (I required entire width of sidewalk to u-turn, approach button and be aimed at ramp), and for tricycles; its completely impossible to turn into the ramp and be able to touch the button. Also in addition to this, when leaving the park and wanting to continue along RCG. Until you get to the ramp to roadway, its impossible to see exactly how much time you have to enter and cross 8th st. Many dive across and hope they make it while its green (waiting for beg button to cycle is annoying). Would be nice to have light that you approach when exiting park and approaching push button.

    BurningNight20 asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your input on the cyclist push button at the Eighth Street and Seventh Avenue intersection. Further details of the recommended design are still being refined, and your input on the crossing button and operations on the Moody Park side will be considered as part of the next steps in advancing the preferred design. 

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    The ramps across 8th st to get to Moody Park are poorly designed. Many riders heading towards the park, have to cut thru the pedestrian ramp to avoid conflicts with cyclists/pedestrians going in opposite directions. It feels like people forgot cycles have a minimum turning circle. Also during the snow removal this past winter, the section that was cleared had zero turning radius. And was only cleared to a width of about 40", making it impossible for any opposing traffic to pass.

    BurningNight20 asked 6 months ago

    Further details of the recommended design are still being refined, and your input on the ramps at the Eighth Street and Seventh Avenue intersection is very much appreciated and will be considered as part of the  next steps in advancing the preferred design.

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    Hello.. I am a long time resident of the City. Thank you for the opportunity to give my comments and for sharing (other surveys verbatim)....I really appreciate this format. I am generally all in favor of my tax dollars going to improvements as on the layouts shown for Both RCG Upgrades and NWSS Cycling connector. However I do have a concern I have brought up in many of your pop up locations and have never really got an answer other than the the nice staff at the booths say they will bring it up in their debriefing meetings... My concern and question is that all these types of improvement are funded from what are Capital/Special funds and once they are built,... no or very little additional Operating funds are allocated for maintaining these improvements.. I do drive, walk and bike throughout the city,.. from Sapperton to Queensbourgh and have noticed pathways along the foreshore along Columbia street are at times overgrown making pathways that are 6 feet down to 3 feet.... the pathway in along Stewardson is also reduced in some areas due to overgrown brushes ...simularily around Port Royal,.. some pathways have so much overgrown brushes that the pathway is reduced so two persons can barley pass each other,...yes,.. I see city staff out there on occasion clearing some sections but not regularly enough to prevent overgrowth to occur,. Its seems to be on a complaint basis,. I and others do call in, but wish we did not have to... In contrast,... The foreshore walk way along the Quay looks wonderful,. There are some planks that need to be replaced but otherwise, every time I walk/bike along that section it is nicely kept,...(maybe there are more people complaining,, good for them, it seems to work). On the other end where the washrooms are and sand play area are located needs some brush trimming along the fenced area is needed so it does not look so unkept. The newly constructed path along Agnes street looks nice as it is new, but even now planters and seating need some TLC.. In addition,.. the walking/biking path along Boyd from Howes to Boundary road is missing a lot of safety railings,...I have commented to various depts in the City,..I did receive some emails saying these are on the list for repairs or replacement,. it has now being over 2-1/2 years and nothing has being done... My question is,. Once these and any other improvements are installed why is not sufficient funding allowed to keep them looking nice,..? Sometimes I think why build all these beautiful improvements just for them to deteriorate and then get residents upset and always have to complain to keep them looking good. Again,. Thank you and all who are involved in these projects, I hope my comments can be used for making things better for our great city.

    F/R asked 6 months ago

    Thank you very much for your comments and question about maintenance of improvements and the corresponding operating funds.  

    Our Engineering Operations staff are essential to maintaining the vast majority of the proposed infrastructure. They are consistently involved throughout the development, implementation and life of the infrastructure. One important piece of this work is working with them to identify the maintenance requirements and corresponding resources. This informs the development of the annual City budget, which includes a five-year financial plan that shows an annually increasing operating budget to account for increases in costs. The annual budget process also provides an opportunity to request enhancements to account for increases in scope (e.g. maintenance that goes beyond what was originally identified).  

    Some other important aspects that impact maintenance include:  

    • We plan to use high-quality and durable materials for the hardscape wherever possible to minimize maintenance requirements 
    • Where landscaping requires additional maintenance, we will work with our Parks and Recreation team and consultant to choose plants and materials that minimize maintenance needs 


    As the scope for Engineering Operations and Parks and Recreation cover a very wide range, there sometimes arise maintenance issues that we may be unaware of, or conditions change between the scheduled maintenance routines in a particular area.  Where this is the case and these come to the attention of residents, we encourage residents to let us know via SeeClickFix (link here).


    Kind regards, 

    The Uptown Active Transportation Project Team

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    Many residents on 7th avenue rely on street parking. The plan will reduce street parking by 50%. Where are the residents supposed to park?

    Delo asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your comment and question regarding the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades. 

    The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) Upgrades will improve safety, comfort, and accessibility on the section of the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway along Seventh Avenue, between Eighth Street and Fifth Street. These projects take direction from the vision set in the City of New Westminster’s Council-approved Uptown Streetscape Vision and align with the City’s Master Transportation Plan goals and 7 Bold Steps for Climate Action – specifically Car-light Community, Quality People-Centered Public Realm and Urban Tree Canopy.  The project goals include providing a crosstown greenway that is safer and more comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, improves the cycling and walking experiences, improves accessibility, enhances the public realm and tree canopy, seeks opportunities for green infrastructure, and reduces the impacts of motor vehicles and through traffic in this neighbourhood.

    However, to realize these upgrades, there are trade-offs required. It is with this in mind that another important goal of the project is to limit the impacts to people who rely on on-street parking.

    In the first round of public engagement, participants indicated that their design preference was for a protected bicycle lane with parking on one side of the street (46% of survey respondents). Based on this feedback, the recommended design includes parking only on the south side of the street. As such, over half (53%) of on-street parking spaces have been retained with the recommended design. There will also be two loading zones maintained on the north side of Seventh Avenue to provide spaces for short term loading ( passenger pick-ups/drop-offs and deliveries, etc.). This maintains five of the six loading zones that are currently in the project area.  

    Kind regards, 

    The Uptown Active Transportation Improvements Team

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    Weather and Uptown Active Transportation Improvements: 1. Snow removal - How will it be done? Is appropriate equipment already available? - When will it be done? How soon after a snow event? (The existing greenway along Seventh Avenue was poorly maintained during the December 2021/January 2022 snow event.) 2. Rain and sun Any structures to add/improve to provide protection from rain and/or provide shade? Not necessarily, but things such as low maintenance canopies?

    UptownRenter asked 6 months ago

    Thank you for your questions on weather and the Uptown Active Transportation Improvements.  

    1. Snow Removal 

    With regard to your question about snow removal, the City utilizes snow plowing and salting for roadways such as Seventh Avenue. Specialized equipment for clearing protected bike facilities are also being explored by the City and we are happy to provide an update as soon as more information is available.

    With regard to your question on the timing of snow removal, the City follows the City of New Westminster’s Snow Response Plan (link here) which prioritizes major routes near transit, hospitals, or schools. The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) would fall under priority 3, which has a target response time of 24 hours after the completion of snow removal for priority 2 routes (which in turn has a target response time of 48 hours after the end of snow fall).  

     

    1. Rain and Sun Protection 

     The proposed design for the RCG includes the addition of a new row of street trees along the south side of the corridor, between     the bike lane and roadway. This would provide shade and contributes to New Westminster’s urban forest canopy cover. 

    New opportunities for weather protection (e.g. street trees, awnings, etc.) will be explored by the City as part of adjacent re-           development projects.

     I hope this information is useful! 

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    If Option 1 is chosen, will you make the East / West alley connection to 'cyclists and pedestrian only' alley and ban cars from using that lane? Since it is not a through lane (no exit to 10th Avenue), that means all the cars will have to enter and exit the back lane from the 8th Avenue. It will cause so much extra travelling time for the residents there and it is dangerous to turn left on the 8th avenue onto the lane given the volume of traffic on the 8th Ave.

    Reg asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for your question and feedback on Option 1 for the NWSS Cycling Connector, specifically with regard to the east/west alley connection. For this option, we do not anticipate closing laneway access to vehicles.  This would be a shared connection for use by vehicles, cyclists, and pedestrians.

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    It's still not clear how the East / West alley connection to 5th Street will be addressed considering it will have bi-directional motor vehicle traffic and bi-directional cycling. The width between property lines is 3 meters (slightly less considering the trees and concrete wall) and there will be an increase of vehicle traffic with the development. This is not enough space for a car to pass a pedestrian. How does the City plan to address this? Are vehicles expected to back out of the alley if encountering a cyclists or pedestrian travel towards them? Are pedestrians / cyclists expected to get off the alley and onto the private property if a vehicles enters the lane or wants to pass them?

    Garey Carlson asked 10 months ago

    Thanks for your question on the portion of the alley that connects to 5th Street for the New Westminster Cycling Connector Option 1. The width of the alley and the corresponding concerns and questions you raise are important considerations for that routing option. In selecting a preferred design, a technical, multiple-account evaluation of the options (for both projects) will also be conducted and will be an important factor, along with public input. The width of the lane would be a component of the technical review for Option 1.

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    I note that in other sections of the fifth street (between eighth and sixth avenue, for example), there are bike signs indicating that the street is shared by cars and bikes and both the landscaped boulevard and street parkings coexist. The fifth street is the least busy between eighth and tenth avenue where the speed of the car is also the slowest due to the number of speed bumps there. Can't we use the same bike feature as in other sections of the fifth street? In that case, both street parkings and landscape can be retained.

    Ribbon asked 10 months ago

    A requirement for this project is that it meets the All Ages and Abilities criteria for motor vehicle traffic volume. The bike route south of Seventh Avenue does not meet this requirement. Due to the inability of the traffic volumes to be reduced below the threshold for an All Ages and Abilities shared bikeway (no more than 500 vehicles per day) on Fifth Street between Eighth and Seventh Avenue this design is not being considered.

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    For option 1, are you going to install designated cycling paths only on Fifth street between eighth and tenth avenue or throughout the whole 5th street? I note that fifth street between eighth and tenth is a quiet section. There are not many cars and the speed of the cars is slow because of many speed bumps. Wouldn't it be enough to use wide shared use lanes? In that case, you don't have to remove street parking spaces.

    Ribbon asked 10 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    Option 1 for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector would involve a protected bicycle facility on Fifth Street all the way from Seventh Avenue to the laneway between Eighth and Tenth Avenue. 

    Protected facilities were identified for Option 1, instead of a shared local street, because of traffic volumes and turning movements at Seventh Avenue and Fifth Street, as many vehicles use Fifth Street to access Westminster Centre shopping mall via Seventh Avenue due to the left turn restrictions at Sixth Avenue. 

    The configurations for this segment could include off-street bike path in the boulevard, which would not impact parking or on-street protected bike lane, which would impact parking. 

     Please note that the protected facilities would not extend north of the laneway towards Tenth Avenue.  

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    If Option 1 is chosen, how are cyclists going to pass Eighth Avenue, which is a busy road with many cars passing at high speed? If a street light is installed there, wouldn't that further slow down the traffic along the Eighth Avenue?

    Ribbon asked 10 months ago

    A pedestrian and cyclist actuated half signal would be installed at the intersection of Fifth Street and Eighth Avenue if Option 1 is selected. The signal may be coordinated with the intersection signal timing at Sixth Street and Eighth Avenue to minimize additional delays for motorists while maintaining safe crossings for people walking and biking.

Page last updated: 07 Jul 2022, 05:11 PM