Uptown Active Transportation Improvements

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Project Update: November 15, 2021

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report is now available. Check out the report for what participants chose as their preferred design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Improvements and preferred routing options for the NWSS Cycling Connector, as well as key priorities for each corridor, as heard from the public and stakeholder groups. A shorter, visual summary is also available here.

The full survey report as well as all participants’ verbatim comments is also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).


Project Update: October 18, 2021

Big thanks from the project team to everyone who came to learn about and provide feedback on design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and routing options for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.

The first round of engagement, including the online survey, is now closed.

A detailed summary of what we heard through the engagement will soon be posted to the Documents section of this page.

The project team will now continue their work on this project, using what we heard from the first round of public engagement, as well as technical analysis, to recommend a design for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and a route for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.

Check back here soon for further updates and information!

Project Update: Please visit us at our upcoming Pop Up on October 14 from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. at New Westminster Secondary School at 6th Street to learn more, ask questions, and provide your feedback on these projects.

The City of New Westminster is launching the design process for the Uptown Active Transportation Improvements. This includes two exciting projects that together will reimagine some of our streets to enable people of all ages and abilities to move comfortably and safely on foot, bicycle, and other non-motorized wheels in Uptown.

  1. The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) Upgrades will improve safety, comfort, and accessibility on the section of the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway along Seventh Avenue, between Eighth Street and Fifth Street. These upgrades will replace the interim bike lanes installed on Seventh Avenue in 2017.
  2. The new New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector project will link the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue to the east entrance of the new school on Sixth Street, enabling students, staff and visitors to conveniently and safely cycle, wheel or walk to the school from the east and south.

Both routes have their own histories, characteristics, and design considerations. We are excited to hear your feedback on possible upgrades with design options for this section of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway, and on possible routing options for the new New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.


Both projects take direction from the vision set in the City of New Westminster’s Council-approved Uptown Streetscape Vision, to create “a vibrant commercial district with a distinct identity, accessible and sustainable transportation, and inviting and engaging public spaces that are welcoming to all people." Related to this project, engagement on the Uptown Sixth Street Public Realm Improvements will launch later this fall.

These projects align with the City’s Master Transportation Plan goals and 7 Bold Steps for Climate Action - specifically, Car-light Community and Quality People-Centred Public Realm.

Another key goal of this project is to provide a crosstown greenway and connection to NWSS that is safer and more comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, improves the cycling and walking experiences, as well as improves accessibility.

Additional goals include enhancing the public realm and tree canopy, seeking opportunities for green infrastructure, and reducing the impacts of motor vehicles and through traffic in this neighbourhood, while limiting the impacts to people who rely on on-street parking.


Opportunities to Learn About the Projects and Provide your Input

The first round of engagement for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and NWSS Cycling Connector projects has launched! The focus of this first round of engagement is to get your input on design options and routing options for each project, and provides the following options for involvement:

  1. Online Community Survey: open until October 17, 2021
  2. Pop-up #1 Saturday (September 25) 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Moody Park (Northeast side near 7th Avenue Junction)
  3. Pop Up #2 Thursday (October 14) 2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – New Westminster Secondary School at 6th Street
  4. Interactive Map: Submit a comment about a specific location in the project area

To learn more about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector, watch the project video below:


Project Update: November 15, 2021

The What We Heard Public Engagement Summary Report is now available. Check out the report for what participants chose as their preferred design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Improvements and preferred routing options for the NWSS Cycling Connector, as well as key priorities for each corridor, as heard from the public and stakeholder groups. A shorter, visual summary is also available here.

The full survey report as well as all participants’ verbatim comments is also available. Find the reports in the Documents section on the right of this page (scroll down on mobile).


Project Update: October 18, 2021

Big thanks from the project team to everyone who came to learn about and provide feedback on design options for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and routing options for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.

The first round of engagement, including the online survey, is now closed.

A detailed summary of what we heard through the engagement will soon be posted to the Documents section of this page.

The project team will now continue their work on this project, using what we heard from the first round of public engagement, as well as technical analysis, to recommend a design for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway upgrades and a route for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.

Check back here soon for further updates and information!

Project Update: Please visit us at our upcoming Pop Up on October 14 from 2:30 to 6:30 p.m. at New Westminster Secondary School at 6th Street to learn more, ask questions, and provide your feedback on these projects.

The City of New Westminster is launching the design process for the Uptown Active Transportation Improvements. This includes two exciting projects that together will reimagine some of our streets to enable people of all ages and abilities to move comfortably and safely on foot, bicycle, and other non-motorized wheels in Uptown.

  1. The Rotary Crosstown Greenway (RCG) Upgrades will improve safety, comfort, and accessibility on the section of the existing Rotary Crosstown Greenway along Seventh Avenue, between Eighth Street and Fifth Street. These upgrades will replace the interim bike lanes installed on Seventh Avenue in 2017.
  2. The new New Westminster Secondary School (NWSS) Cycling Connector project will link the Rotary Crosstown Greenway on Seventh Avenue to the east entrance of the new school on Sixth Street, enabling students, staff and visitors to conveniently and safely cycle, wheel or walk to the school from the east and south.

Both routes have their own histories, characteristics, and design considerations. We are excited to hear your feedback on possible upgrades with design options for this section of the Rotary Crosstown Greenway, and on possible routing options for the new New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector.


Both projects take direction from the vision set in the City of New Westminster’s Council-approved Uptown Streetscape Vision, to create “a vibrant commercial district with a distinct identity, accessible and sustainable transportation, and inviting and engaging public spaces that are welcoming to all people." Related to this project, engagement on the Uptown Sixth Street Public Realm Improvements will launch later this fall.

These projects align with the City’s Master Transportation Plan goals and 7 Bold Steps for Climate Action - specifically, Car-light Community and Quality People-Centred Public Realm.

Another key goal of this project is to provide a crosstown greenway and connection to NWSS that is safer and more comfortable for people of all ages and abilities, improves the cycling and walking experiences, as well as improves accessibility.

Additional goals include enhancing the public realm and tree canopy, seeking opportunities for green infrastructure, and reducing the impacts of motor vehicles and through traffic in this neighbourhood, while limiting the impacts to people who rely on on-street parking.


Opportunities to Learn About the Projects and Provide your Input

The first round of engagement for the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and NWSS Cycling Connector projects has launched! The focus of this first round of engagement is to get your input on design options and routing options for each project, and provides the following options for involvement:

  1. Online Community Survey: open until October 17, 2021
  2. Pop-up #1 Saturday (September 25) 11:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. at Moody Park (Northeast side near 7th Avenue Junction)
  3. Pop Up #2 Thursday (October 14) 2:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. – New Westminster Secondary School at 6th Street
  4. Interactive Map: Submit a comment about a specific location in the project area

To learn more about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades and the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector, watch the project video below:


Question and Answer

Have a question about the Rotary Crosstown Greenway Upgrades or the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector? Please add it here and press submit. We will aim to reply within 5 business days. Sometimes answers require information from multiple sources. If the answer is going to take longer, we will let you know. If we think your question may be of interest to others, we'll post your question and our response here. Thank you for taking the time to write to us!

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  • Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

    If Option 1 is chosen, will you make the East / West alley connection to 'cyclists and pedestrian only' alley and ban cars from using that lane? Since it is not a through lane (no exit to 10th Avenue), that means all the cars will have to enter and exit the back lane from the 8th Avenue. It will cause so much extra travelling time for the residents there and it is dangerous to turn left on the 8th avenue onto the lane given the volume of traffic on the 8th Ave.

    Reg asked 3 months ago

    Thank you for your question and feedback on Option 1 for the NWSS Cycling Connector, specifically with regard to the east/west alley connection. For this option, we do not anticipate closing laneway access to vehicles.  This would be a shared connection for use by vehicles, cyclists, and pedestrians.

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    It's still not clear how the East / West alley connection to 5th Street will be addressed considering it will have bi-directional motor vehicle traffic and bi-directional cycling. The width between property lines is 3 meters (slightly less considering the trees and concrete wall) and there will be an increase of vehicle traffic with the development. This is not enough space for a car to pass a pedestrian. How does the City plan to address this? Are vehicles expected to back out of the alley if encountering a cyclists or pedestrian travel towards them? Are pedestrians / cyclists expected to get off the alley and onto the private property if a vehicles enters the lane or wants to pass them?

    Garey Carlson asked 3 months ago

    Thanks for your question on the portion of the alley that connects to 5th Street for the New Westminster Cycling Connector Option 1. The width of the alley and the corresponding concerns and questions you raise are important considerations for that routing option. In selecting a preferred design, a technical, multiple-account evaluation of the options (for both projects) will also be conducted and will be an important factor, along with public input. The width of the lane would be a component of the technical review for Option 1.

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    I note that in other sections of the fifth street (between eighth and sixth avenue, for example), there are bike signs indicating that the street is shared by cars and bikes and both the landscaped boulevard and street parkings coexist. The fifth street is the least busy between eighth and tenth avenue where the speed of the car is also the slowest due to the number of speed bumps there. Can't we use the same bike feature as in other sections of the fifth street? In that case, both street parkings and landscape can be retained.

    Ribbon asked 4 months ago

    A requirement for this project is that it meets the All Ages and Abilities criteria for motor vehicle traffic volume. The bike route south of Seventh Avenue does not meet this requirement. Due to the inability of the traffic volumes to be reduced below the threshold for an All Ages and Abilities shared bikeway (no more than 500 vehicles per day) on Fifth Street between Eighth and Seventh Avenue this design is not being considered.

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    For option 1, are you going to install designated cycling paths only on Fifth street between eighth and tenth avenue or throughout the whole 5th street? I note that fifth street between eighth and tenth is a quiet section. There are not many cars and the speed of the cars is slow because of many speed bumps. Wouldn't it be enough to use wide shared use lanes? In that case, you don't have to remove street parking spaces.

    Ribbon asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question.

    Option 1 for the New Westminster Secondary School Cycling Connector would involve a protected bicycle facility on Fifth Street all the way from Seventh Avenue to the laneway between Eighth and Tenth Avenue. 

    Protected facilities were identified for Option 1, instead of a shared local street, because of traffic volumes and turning movements at Seventh Avenue and Fifth Street, as many vehicles use Fifth Street to access Westminster Centre shopping mall via Seventh Avenue due to the left turn restrictions at Sixth Avenue. 

    The configurations for this segment could include off-street bike path in the boulevard, which would not impact parking or on-street protected bike lane, which would impact parking. 

     Please note that the protected facilities would not extend north of the laneway towards Tenth Avenue.  

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    If Option 1 is chosen, how are cyclists going to pass Eighth Avenue, which is a busy road with many cars passing at high speed? If a street light is installed there, wouldn't that further slow down the traffic along the Eighth Avenue?

    Ribbon asked 4 months ago

    A pedestrian and cyclist actuated half signal would be installed at the intersection of Fifth Street and Eighth Avenue if Option 1 is selected. The signal may be coordinated with the intersection signal timing at Sixth Street and Eighth Avenue to minimize additional delays for motorists while maintaining safe crossings for people walking and biking.

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    If the Fifth St route is chosen, where will the bike lanes be constructed? Will they be built into the existing roadway or on the boulevards?

    NW99 asked 4 months ago

    We are currently exploring design options that are both on-street and off-street for Route Option 1 on Fifth Street. The off-street option would most likely be a two-way bicycle pathway on the west side of the street between the existing sidewalk and trees. The on-street options being explored include both a two-way protected bike lane on one side of the street, and one-way protected bike lanes on each side of the street. Both of the on-street options would require on-street parking to be removed. 

    The current round of engagement is on the different routing options and will use public input as well as technical data to inform the project team’s recommendation of one of these proposed routes. There will also be a second round of public and stakeholder engagement to occur in early 2022. The second round will be to present a design option for the preferred route, likely with some options for design treatments. 

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    Today we rode through the alley portion of route option 1 where it connects to 5th Street and found it only wide enough to fit one motor vehicle. There isn't enough room for a pedestrian or cyclists and a car. If option 1 is selected, how is the City going to make this safe enough for bi-directional movements of cars, pedestrians and cyclists?

    Garey Carlson asked 4 months ago

    If Option 1 is selected as the preferred option of the NWSS Cycling Connector, we would look to improve it within the available right-of-way which is similar to the width of a typical multi-use pathway. The vehicle volumes are very low so we anticipate this could work with vehicles and bicycles sharing the lane.

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    Will the 6th Street and 8th Avenue intersection be improved to make it safer regardless of the highschool connector option that is selected? If not, will it be improved for option 2 and 3?

    Garey Carlson asked 4 months ago

    Both Option 2 and Option 3 for the NWSS Cycling Connector will require modifications at the 6th Street and 8th Avenue intersection which will introduce opportunities to explore opportunities to address safety at the intersection. Option 1 does not include improvements at the 6th Street and 8th Avenue intersection. 

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    The Fifth St. route indicates a bike path to Sixth St. where houses currently exist. How will that path be created?

    Dayv asked 4 months ago

    Thank you for your question. The first half block from Fifth Street towards Sixth Street is to be a shared facility using the existing laneway right-of-way, and the second half block will be a newly constructed multi-use pathway built in conjunction with the new multi-family development slated for 823-841 Sixth Street. Also, please note there was an error in the alignment on the initial map showing the Fifth Street route option for the NWSS Cycling Connector. This is now corrected and we have included the updated and correct map below for your reference.  

Page last updated: 26 November 2021, 09:07